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Create a bootable USB flash drive for Windows 8


Summary : How to create a bootable USB flash drive from Windows 8 ISO.

While installing from a DVD is suitable in most situations, you may want to be able to install Windows 8 from a USB flash drive. Fortunately, doing so is not as difficult as it once was. In fact, Microsoft has a utility called the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool that will allow you to convert the ISO image so that it can boot from a USB flash drive. (Keep in mind that while the tool has Windows 7 in its name, it will still work for Windows 8.)

In this article, I’ll show you how to download, install and use the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool to transfer the Windows 8 Enterprise evaluation ISO to a bootable USB flash drive. Keep in mind that while I’ll use the Windows 8 Enterprise evaluation ISO as my example, this procedure will work with any Windows 7 or Windows 8 ISO.

What you need

To install the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool, you need at least a Pentium 233 MHz processor and 50MB of free hard disk space. You can install the tool in Windows XP SP2, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 (32-bit or 64-bit). Your USB flash drive must be at least 4GB and it should not have any other files on it. In fact, I recommend that you perform a full format of your USB flash drive; just to be sure that it is error free.

If you are running Windows XP, you will need to download and install both Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 and Microsoft Image Mastering API v2 before you install the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool. Keep in mind that the most current version of the .NET Framework is 4.5, but if you only want to download 2.0, previous versions are available on the .NET site linked above.

Downloading the tool

Downloading the tool is easy. To begin, head over to the Microsoft Store’s Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool page and scroll down until you see the download link. When you click it you’ll be prompted to either Run or Save the tool. For my example, I chose to save the file so that I could experiment with the tool on various machines.

downloading the tool : ehack

downloading the tool : ehack

Installing the tool

After I downloaded the file to my hard disk, I double-clicked the executable and was prompted with a Security Warning. You’ll see a similar warning if you choose to Run the installation from the download site.

Installing the tool : ehack

Installing the tool : ehack

As soon as you click Run, you’ll see the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool Setup Wizard. The installation runs pretty quickly via the four step wizard and the first and last screens of the wizard are shown in figure.

Installation Wizard : ehack

Installation Wizard : ehack

Running the tool

Once the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool is installed, I recommend that you insert your 4GB or larger USB flash drive and wait for it to be recognized. That way, the drive will be ready when you are running the tool. When the flash drive is ready, you can launch the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool from the Start menu. As soon as you do, you’ll encounter a User Account Control dialog box.

Running the tool : ehack

Running the tool : ehack

When the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool displays its first screen, you’ll be prompted to locate and select the ISO file. (As a sidebar, I must point out that the first time that I saw this screen I was a little startled to see Microsoft Store in the title bar – I had expected a more traditional looking wizard interface, like the one from the setup. Not a big deal by any means, it just took a little getting used to.)

Choose ISO file : ehack

Choose ISO file : ehack

On the second screen, you will click the USB device button. However, as you can see, you can just as easily select DVD as the media type. (If you are running Windows XP, which doesn’t include a tool like Windows 7’s Windows Disc Image Burner tool, this tool comes in handy if want to burn a Windows 8 ISO to DVD.)

Select USB device : ehack

Select USB device : ehack

When the third screen appears, you should see your USB flash drive in the list box. If not, click the Refresh button adjacent to the list box. Once your drive appears, click the Begin copying button. As soon as you do, the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool will perform a quick format of the flash drive, ostensibly to make it a bootable drive.

Begin Copying : ehack

Begin Copying : ehack

Once the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool begins copying the file to the drive, from start to finish the process will take anywhere from 5 to 10 minutes to complete depending on the speed of your flash drive. When it is done, the status will indicate Backup completed. The beginning and ending of the copy operation are shown in figure. When the copy operation is done, just click the close button in the upper right corner.

Creating process starts : ehack

Creating process starts : ehack

When the operation is finished, you can launch Windows Explorer and take a peek at the contents of your now bootable USB flash drive.

Contents of USB flash drive : ehack

Contents of USB flash drive : ehack

Booting from the USB flash drive

Once you insert the bootable USB flash drive into the system on which you want to install Windows 8, restart the system, and then follow the onscreen instructions to access the boot menu.  Using the down arrow, I selected the USB Flash MemoryPMAP option and pressed [Enter].

Boot Menu : ehack

Boot Menu : ehack

Within a few moments, you’ll see the new Windows flag on the screen,  indicating that Windows 8 Setup is being initialized.

windows : ehack

windows : ehack

Original Post at TechRepublic

Thanks for reading. hope it might helped you.
http://ehack.thegeoadventure.com/

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10 amazingly alternative operating systems


This post is about the desktop operating systems that fly under the radar of most people. We are definitely not talking about Windows, Mac OS X or Linux, or even BSD or Solaris. There are much less mainstream options out there for the OS-curious.

These alternative operating systems are usually developed either by enthusiasts or small companies (or both), and there are more of them than you might expect. There are even more than we have included in this article, though we think this is a good selection of the more interesting ones and we have focused specifically on desktop operating systems.

As you will see, many of them are very different from what you may be used to. We will discuss the potential of this in the conclusion of this article.

Enough introduction, let’s get started! Here is a look at 10 alternative operating systems, starting with a familiar old name…

AmigaOS 4.1

This month (September 2008) AmigaOS 4.1 was released. Although AmigaOS is a veteran in the field (many have fond memories of the original Amiga computer), its current version is a fully modern OS.

AmigaOS only runs on specific PowerPC-based hardware platforms. The companyACube is currently marketing and distributing AmigaOS and is going to bundle the OS with their motherboards.

AmigaOS 4.1 : ehack

AmigaOS 4.1 : ehack

Source model: Closed source

License: Proprietary

Platform: PowerPC

State: Final

Read a review of AmigaOS 4.1 at Arstechnica.

Haiku

Haiku is an open source project aimed at recreating and continuing the development of the BeOS operating system (which Palm Inc. bought and then discontinued). Haiku was initially known as OpenBeOS but changed its name in 2004.

Haiku is compatible with software written for BeOS.

Haiku OS : ehack

Haiku OS : ehack

Source model: Free and open source

License: MIT License

Platform: x86 and PowerPC

State: Pre-Alpha

Read more at the Haiku website.

ReactOS

ReactOS is an operating system designed to be compatible with Microsoft Windows software. The project started in 1998 and today it can run many Windows programs well. The ReactOS kernel has been written from scratch but the OS makes use of Wine to be able to run Windows applications.

ReactOS : ehack

ReactOS : ehack

Source model: Free and open source

License: Various free software licenses

Platform: x86 (more under development)

State: Alpha

Read more at the ReactOS website.

Syllable Desktop

Syllable is a free and open source operating system that was forked in 2002 fromAtheOS, an AmigaOS clone. It’s intended as a lightweight and fast OS suitable for home and small office users.

Syllable Desktop : ehack

Syllable Desktop : ehack

Source model: Free and open source

License: GNU General Public License

Platform: x86

State: Alpha

Read more at the Syllable website.

SkyOS

SkyOS is a closed source project written by Robert Szeleney and volunteers. It originally started as an experiment in OS design. It’s intended to be an easy-to-use desktop OS for average computer users. Well-known applications such as Firefox have been ported to run on SkyOS.

SkyOS : ehack

SkyOS : ehack

Source model: Closed source

License: Proprietary

Platform: x86

State: Beta

Read more at the SkyOS website.

MorphOS

MorphOS is a lightweight, media-centric OS build to run on PowerPC processors. It is inspired by AmigaOS and also includes emulation to be able to run Amiga applications.

MorphOS : ehack

MorphOS : ehack

Source model: Closed source

License: Mixed proprietary and open source

Platform: Pegasos, some Amiga models, EFIKA

Read more at the MorphOS website.

AROS Research Operating System

AROS is a lightweight open source OS designed to be compatible with AmigaOS 3.1 but also improve on it. The project was started in 1995 and can today be run on both PowerPC and IBM PC compatible hardware. It also includes an emulator that makes it possible to run old Amiga applications.

AROS Research Operating System : ehack

AROS Research Operating System : ehack

Source model: Open source

License: AROS Public License

Platform: x86 and PowerPC

Read more at the AROS website.

MenuetOS

MenuetOS, also known as MeOS, is an operating system written entirely in assembly language which makes it very small and fast. Even though it includes a graphical desktop, networking and many other features it still fits on a single 1.44 MB floppy disk (for our younger readers, that was the USB stick of the 80s and early 90s ;) ).

MenuetOS : ehack

MenuetOS : ehack

Source model: Open source (32-bit version), freeware (64-bit version)

License: Menuet License

Platform: x86

State: Beta

Read more at the MenuetOS website.

DexOS

DexOS is an open source operating system designed to work like the minimalistic ones on gaming consoles, but for PCs. Its user interface is inspired by video game consoles and the system itself is very small (supposedly this one also fits on a floppy disk, like MenuetOS) and the OS can be booted from several different devices. Its creators have tried to make it as fast as possible.

DexOS : ehack

DexOS : ehack

Source model: Free and open source

Platform: x86

Read more at the DexOS website.

Visopsys

Visopsys is a one-man hobby project by programmer Andy McLaughlin. The development began in 1997 and the OS is both open source and free. Visopsys stands for VISual Operating SYStem.

Visopsys : ehack

Visopsys : ehack

Source model: Open source

License: GPL

Platform: x86

State: Final

Read more at the Visopsys website.

 

 

Original Post at http://royal.pingdom.com/2008/09/26/10-amazingly-alternative-operating-systems-and-what-they-could-mean-for-the-future/

Thanks for reading. hope it might helped you.
http://ehack.thegeoadventure.com/

India developing own OS to boost cybersecurity


Summary: Defense Research and Development Organization is creating country’s own operating system to reduce its dependence on foreign operating systems, which it says may contain security risks.

india's OS : ehack

india’s OS : ehack

The Indian Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) is developing the country’s own operating system (OS) in a bid to establish a more robust cybersecurity environment.

India currently is dependent on many imported OSes based on Windows and Linux, which are likely to have malicious worms and security issues, DRDO’s Director-General VK Saraswat said at the Navigation and Communication (NAVCOM) conference, The Times of India reported Thursday. Hence, it is essential India builds its own operating system, he said.

Saraswat added the DRDO is 18 months into a programme in which 150 engineers across the country had been working on creating an Indian OS. It will take another three years before this platform will be ready, he said.

The made-in-India OS does not involve any foreign investments and is exclusively “India’s effort”, Saraswat noted. He also advised defence researchers and scientists to start working together with the industry, DRDO, and other scientific departments to drive the development of the OS, so “[India is] independent from what is coming from [the] outside world”.

This initiative is part of India’s latest efforts to beef up its cybersecurity. Earlier this week, the government unveiled a five-year plan to revamp the country’s cybersecurity posture, whereby, operations will be coordinated and connected to major critical infrastructure agencies across India, to monitor real-time information and react faster to cyberattacks.

 

Original Post at Zdnet

Thanks for reading. hope it might helped you.
http://ehack.thegeoadventure.com/

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