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How to Crack a Wi-Fi Network’s WEP Password with BackTrack


You already know that if you want to lock down your Wi-Fi network, you should opt for WPA encryption because WEP is easy to crack. But did you know how easy? Take a look.

How to Crack a Wi-Fi Network’s WEP Password with BackTrack : ehack

How to Crack a Wi-Fi Network’s WEP Password with BackTrack : ehack

Note: This post demonstrates how to crack WEP passwords, an older and less often used network security protocol. If the network you want to crack is using the more popular WPA encryption, see our guide to cracking a Wi-Fi network’s WPA password with Reaver instead.

Today we’re going to run down, step-by-step, how to crack a Wi-Fi network with WEP security turned on. But first, a word: Knowledge is power, but power doesn’t mean you should be a jerk, or do anything illegal. Knowing how to pick a lock doesn’t make you a thief. Consider this post educational, or a proof-of-concept intellectual exercise.

Dozens of tutorials on how to crack WEP are already all over the internet using this method. Seriously—Google it. This ain’t what you’d call “news.” But what is surprising is that someone like me, with minimal networking experience, can get this done with free software and a cheap Wi-Fi adapter. Here’s how it goes.

What You’ll Need

  • A compatible wireless adapter—This is the biggest requirement. You’ll need a wireless adapter that’s capable of packet injection, and chances are the one in your computer is not. After consulting with my friendly neighborhood security expert, I purchased an Alfa AWUS050NH USB adapter, pictured here, and it set me back about $50 on Amazon. Update: Don’t do what I did. Get the Alfa AWUS036H, not the US050NH, instead. The guy in this video below is using a $12 model he bought on Ebay (and is even selling his router of choice). There are plenty of resources on getting aircrack-compatible adapters out there.
  • A BackTrack Live CD. We already took you on a full screenshot tour of how to install and use BackTrack 3, the Linux Live CD that lets you do all sorts of security testing and tasks. Download yourself a copy of the CD and burn it, or load it up in VMware to get started.
  • A nearby WEP-enabled Wi-Fi network. The signal should be strong and ideally people are using it, connecting and disconnecting their devices from it. The more use it gets while you collect the data you need to run your crack, the better your chances of success.
  • Patience with the command line. This is an ten-step process that requires typing in long, arcane commands and waiting around for your Wi-Fi card to collect data in order to crack the password. Like the doctor said to the short person, be a little patient.

Crack That WEP

To crack WEP, you’ll need to launch Konsole, BackTrack’s built-in command line. It’s right there on the taskbar in the lower left corner, second button to the right. Now, the commands.

First run the following to get a list of your network interfaces:

airmon-ng

The only one I’ve got there is labeled ra0. Yours may be different; take note of the label and write it down. From here on in, substitute it in everywhere a command includes (interface).

Now, run the following four commands. See the output that I got for them in the screenshot below.


airmon-ng stop (interface)
ifconfig (interface) down
macchanger --mac 00:11:22:33:44:55 (interface)
airmon-ng start (interface)

How to Crack a Wi-Fi Network’s WEP Password with BackTrack : ehack

How to Crack a Wi-Fi Network’s WEP Password with BackTrack : ehack

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Ubuntu’s Mobile OS Launched, Coming to Phones Later in 2013


The gap between mobile devices and PCs is becoming smaller and more blurred as handsets and tablets evolve. Now, a major player in the PC universe is making a presence in the smartphone industry, as Canonical has just unveiled the first Ubuntu themed operating system for mobile devices.

Just yesterday Canonical began to tease that an Ubuntu-based software for phones would be revealed, but until Wednesday many of the details remained a mystery. The company wasted no time, as Canonical posted a countdown teaser on Ubuntu’s homepage on the first day of 2013. The phrase “So close, you can almost touch it” was posted alongside the countdown, alluding that a significant announcement would come soon.

Touted as a “superphone that’s also a full PC,” the Ubuntu mobile operating system will be built around existing Android kernel and drivers. However, it will not use Java Virtual Machine but does promise to use “the full power of the phone.” This Ubuntu-based smartphone OS will support both ARM and x86 processors, which means that Android hardware manufacturers and developers should be able to adopt the operating system with little trouble.

Although Ubuntu’s mobile software is still in its early stages, an Android version of the Linux-based operating system was announced about one year ago in February 2012. This marked the first step toward a mobile presence for Ubuntu and Canonical chief Mark Shuttleworth says that the software’s Android variant is set to launch this year. No carrier or manufacturer support has been announced yet, but the mobile Ubuntu handset should be provided by a “high end” Android manufacturer, according to The Verge.

Full-fledged Ubuntu handsets are expected to come in early 2014, and this would line up with the company’s production schedule seeing as Ubuntu for Android was announced in early 2012. While we may not be seeing an Ubuntu device anytime too soon, a number of demo phones have been shown off in the UK. Over the next couple of weeks, downloadable images of the development platform will be available for the Galaxy Nexus. This device is the only known handset that will support Ubuntu for now, but Canonical is likely to roll it out to more devices as developers perfect Ubuntu’s mobile ecosystem.

Sources– lifehacker, digitaltrends

Thanks for reading. hope it might helped you.
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