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Facebook Announces 2013 Hacker Cup Competition


Hackers, start your keyboards: Facebook has officially opened registration for its third annual Hacker Cup, set to begin at the end of this month.

facebook hacker cup : ehack

facebook hacker cup : ehack

Facebook has announced that it has opened registration for the Hacker Cup, its annual competition for programmers with a $10,000 top prize, up from $5,000 last year, for the best of them all. Facebook holds the Hacker Cup in rounds, starting first online and then culminating in a final onsite round at Facebook’s HQ in Menlo Park, CA for the top 25 programmers. This years preliminary rounds will be held between January 25 and February 16. Facebook will fly the top 25 for the onsite final round that takes place March 22-23.

The Hacker Cup is important for a couple of reasons. For one is shows that, although Facebook is pushing past one billion members of its social network and is now one of the world’s biggest public tech companies, it is committed to trying to staying close to its Hacker Way roots.

This is important for it to stay innovative, but it also helps keep Facebook in touch with the world community of top, smart programmers — an obvious route to tapping for top engineering talent.

Facebook says that those who registered for a previous year are automatically registered for the competition year, although they still need to check their information is up-to-date.

There is no limit to the number of people registering for the competition, as long as you sign up by the end of the first round, on the 27th of January.

But there are a few limits on who can participate. Facebook notes in its rules and regulations that you need to be registered on Facebook yourself, you need to be 18 or older, and you cannot be resident in Quebec (!) or any other place where these kinds of competitions are prohibited by law. You also need to provide your real name, postal address, phone number, email address, and date of birth, which may weed out a few Anonymous types, as brilliant as some of them may be.

The competition will follow the same form as in past years. Rather than free-form hackathon-style hacking, contestants are given problem sets that they need to solve. Answers come by way of source code and an output file to show how it works. They will be judged on how well they can come up with the solution in a set period of time, via a timer in the input set. They have six minutes to submit the source code and output file — and they can submit multiple answers in that time.

Last year, the Hacker Cup attracted 8,000 hopefuls from 150 countries, but the final 25 came from a relatively narrow list of countries – Russia, Germany, Poland, Ukraine, China, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and the U.S., with the winner, Roman Andreev, hailing from Russia. You can read more about him and last year’s competition here. Just as it is telling that Facebook runs a Hacker Cup, it will be telling to see how many enter this year and how the country spread for finalists compares.

 

 

Original post at –TechCrunch

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Malware stole 3000 confidential Documents from Japan ministry


malware attack : ehack

malware attack : ehack

Japan ministry become the recent victim of a cyber attack through a malware that suspected to have compromised and sent overseas more than 3,000 confidential documents from the ministry, including many on global trade negotiations.

After investigation, experts found that Hackers use “HTran” the Advanced Persistant Threat (APT) exploit kit for attack. Computers at country’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery suspected to be infected from this.

HTran is a rudimentary connection bouncer, designed to redirect TCP traffic destined for one host to an alternate host. The source code copyright notice indicates that HTran was authored by “lion”, a well-known Chinese hacker and member of “HUC”, the Honker Union of China.

A lot of the documents were about the negotiations over the US-led Trans-Pacific Partnership multilateral trade pact. According to a report from SecureWorks, Dell’s security division, in 2011 that the malware is believed to have been developed by a Chinese hacker group back in 2003.

HTran is used by many APT hackers to disguise the location of their command and control (C2) servers. The National Information Security Center of the Cabinet Secretariat discovered about one year ago that suspicious transmissions involving HTran had occurred at the ministry.

But no individuals or groups have been identified as the culprits in this new cyber attack as the police continue to investigate. The police will ask the ministry to explain how it discovered cyber-attacks and confirm whether a leak actually took place, the police sources said.

Original post at –thehackernews

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Hacker leaks Bangladesh Intelligence classified Emails


Indian hacker, Godzilla once again hit Bangladesh government server. Hacker told us about his latest cyber attack on Directorate General of Forces Intelligence Bangladesh (DGFI – http://www.dgfi.gov.bd) server . He claimed to back up all confidential mails in the server and list of all their agents around the globe.

Bangladesh Intelligence webserver compromised : ehack

Bangladesh Intelligence webserver compromised : ehack

Hacker taunt Bangladesh govt , “To all stupid Intelligence people of Bangladesh do you know what is security??, Iam really felling pitty for you.”

Through a paste note, hacker leak one sample mail (funny one), which is the conversation between Dewan Mamoon and DGFI Director. Some words from email are, “I love the CIA. I love the DGFI. I love the Bangladesh armed forces. I love America and I love Bangladesh.” and “I know that you are the ones to thank for sponsoring me in Bangladesh and the CIA for sponsoring me in America.”
Compromised Intelligence server claimed to be full of sensitive information. In past year, Godzilla had hacked many Bangladeshi and Pakistani Government and Military websites.

 

Original post at – thehackernews

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http://ehack.thegeoadventure.com/

Top 10 Hackers of all time


Takeaway: Black hat, white hat, or somewhere in between, hackers have had a huge impact on the evolution of information technology. See if you agree that these 10 hackers belong on this list.

Hacking is not a recent invention. In fact, it has been around since the 1930s, although not always associated with computers. Here’s a rundown of some of the most noteworthy hackers in history.

1.Kevin Mitnick

Kevin-Mitnick : ehack

Kevin-Mitnick : ehack

Kevin Mitnick, once considered the most-wanted cybercriminal in the United States, is often touted as the poster child of computer hacking. Kevin mastered an early form of social engineering (scamming operators) and computer hacking to gain access to and modify telephony switching systems. After a very public two-year chase, arrest ,and incarceration, the hacker community collectively rose in protest against what they viewed as a witch hunt.

2.Robert Tappan Morris

robert tappan morris : ehack

robert tappan morris : ehack

On November 2, 1988, Robert Morris released a worm that brought down one-tenth of the Internet. With the need for social acceptance that seems to infect many young hackers, Morris made the mistake of chatting about his worm for months before he actually released it on the Internet, so it didn’t take long for the police to track him down. Morris said it was just a stunt and added that he truly regretted wreaking $15 million worth of damage, the estimated amount of carnage caused by his worm.

3.Vladimir Levin

vladimir levin : ehack

vladimir levin : ehack

Seeming like the opening of a James Bond movie, Vladimir Levin was working on his laptop in 1994 from his St. Petersburg, Russia, apartment. He transferred $10 million from Citibank clients to his own accounts around the world. As with most Bond movies, Levin’s career as a hacker was short lived — with a capture, imprisonment, and recovery of all but $400,000 of the original $10 million.

4.Yan Romanowski

Yan Romanowski : ehack

Yan Romanowski : ehack

Yan Romanowski, also known as MafiaBoy, was arrested in February 2000 for launching a denial-of-service attack that brought down many of the Internet’s largest sites, including Amazon, eBay, and Yahoo. Yan’s lawyer claimed, “If [MafiaBoy] had used all his powers, he could have done unimaginable damage.” It is widely believed that Romanowski is no more than a script kiddie. His attacks, however successful, were implemented using computer scripts that clogged networks full of garbage data.

5.Kevin Poulsen

Kevin Poulsen : ehack

Kevin Poulsen : ehack

Kevin Poulsen, known as Dark Dante in the hacker community, specialized in hacking phone systems, particularly radio stations. This talent allowed only calls originating from his house to make it through to the station, assuring him of wins in listener radio contests. His iconic 1991 hack was a takeover of all of the telephone lines for the Los Angeles KIIS-FM radio station, guaranteeing that he would be the 102nd caller and win the prize of a Porsche 944 S2. The bold Poulsen was wanted by the FBI for federal computer hacking at the same time he was winning the Porsche and $20,000 in prize money at a separate station. Poulsen spent 51 months in a federal prison, the longest sentence of a cybercriminal at that time.

6.Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs : ehack

Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs : ehack

The now-famous founders of Apple Computer spent part of their youth as hackers. They spent their pre-Apple days (circa 1971) building Blue Box devices (an early phreaking tool allowing users to make long distance calls without the financial charges) and selling them to fellow students at the University of California, Berkeley.

7.David Smith

David Smith : ehack

David Smith : ehack

Smith’s fame comes from being the author of the infamous email virus known as Melissa. According to Smith, the Melissa virus was never meant to cause harm, but its simple means of propagation (each infected computer sent out multiple infected emails) overloaded computer systems and servers around the world. Smith’s virus was unusual in that it was originally hidden in a file containing passwords to 80 well-known pornography Web sites. Even though more than 60,000 email viruses have been discovered, Smith is the only person to go to federal prison in the United States for sending one.

8. Jonathan James

Jonathan James : ehack

Jonathan James : ehack

James gained notoriety when he became the first juvenile, at age 16, to be sent to prison for hacking. James specialized in hacking high-profile government systems, such as NASA and the Department of Defense. He was reported to have stolen software worth more than $1.7 million.

9.George Hotz

George Hotz : ehack

George Hotz : ehack

While George Hotz may be a renowned jailbreak artist, he’s best known for being named as the primary reason for the April 2011 PlayStation breach. As one of the first hackers to jailbreak the Sony PlayStation 3, Hotz found himself in the middle of a very mean, public, and messy court battle with Sony — perhaps because of his public release of his jailbreaking methods. In stated retaliation, the hacker group Anonymous attacked Sony in what has been the most costly security break of all time. Hotz denied any responsibility for the attack and said, “Running homebrew and exploring security on your devices is cool; hacking into someone else’s server and stealing databases of user info is not cool.”

10.Gary McKinnon

Gary McKinnon : ehack

Gary McKinnon : ehack

In 2002, a decidedly odd message appeared on a U.S. Army computer: “Your security system is crap,” it read. “I am Solo. I will continue to disrupt at the highest levels.” It was later found to be the work of Gary McKinnon, a Scottish system administrator. Gary has been accused of mounting the largest ever hack of U.S. government computer networks — including Army, Air Force, Navy, and NASA systems. The court has recommended that McKinnon be extradited to the United States to face charges of illegally accessing 97 computers, causing $700,000 in damage. Adding even more interest to McKinnon’s actions is his insistence that much of his hacking was in search of information on UFOs, information he believed the U.S. government was hiding in its military computers.

Alan Wlasuk is managing partner of 403 Web Security, a full-service secure Web application development company.

 

Original Post at TechRepublic

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How Phishing Works ?


phishing : ehack

phishing : ehack

Suppose you check your e-mail one day and find a message from your bank. You’ve gotten e-mail from them before, but this one seems suspicious, especially since it threatens to close your account if you don’t reply immediately. What do you do?

This message and others like it are examples of phishing, a method of online identity theft. In addition to stealing personal and financial data, phishers can infect computers with viruses and convince people to participate unwittingly in money laundering.

Most people associate phishing with e-mail messages that spoof, or mimic, banks, credit card companies or other business like Amazon and eBay. These messages look authentic and attempt to get victims to reveal their personal information. But e-mail messages are only one small piece of a phishing scam.

From beginning to end, the process involves:

  1. Planning. Phishers decide which business to target and determine how to get e-mail addresses for the customers of that business. They often use the same mass-mailing and address collection techniques as spammers.
  2. Setup. Once they know which business to spoof and who their victims are, phishers create methods for delivering the message and collecting the data. Most often, this involves e-mail addresses and a Web page.
  3. Attack. This is the step people are most familiar with — the phisher sends a phony message that appears to be from a reputable source.
  4. Collection. Phishers record the information victims enter into Web pages or popup windows.
  5. Identity Theft and Fraud. The phishers use the information they’ve gathered to make illegal purchases or otherwise commit fraud. As many as a fourth of the victims never fully recover [Source:Information Week].

If the phisher wants to coordinate another attack, he evaluates the successes and failures of the completed scam and begins the cycle again.

Phishing scams take advantages of software and security weaknesses on both the client and server sides. But even the most high-tech phishing scams work like old-fashioned con jobs, in which a hustler convinces his mark that he is reliable and trustworthy. Next, we’ll look at the steps phishers take to convince victims that their messages are legitimate.

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